Keeping a Distance

We were glad to get on the water March 21st. The stay-at-home order suggests that outdoor activities such as hiking and bicycling are essential – as long as you practice social distancing. So Saturday we decided some outdoor activity was in order.

It felt a little weird going out since we’ve become hyper-sensitive to the health risks of the coronavirus. Walking the dog, I find myself making an inventory of everything I touch. Has another person touched that tennis ball? Can I get in and out of the dog park without touching the gate? Go home and wash hands!

Is it OK to drive the short distance from home to the kayak launch site at Ferry Point? I see advice to put the kayak away and not even think about paddling until the order is lifted. After weighing the risks, we loaded up the kayaks and drove to Ferry Point.

Ferry Point is along the Miller/Knox Regional Shoreline, part of the East Bay Regional Park District. When we arrived at 10 a.m., the gate to the parking lot was locked. We parked on the street and carried our boats down to the deserted beach. On the water, we followed a freighter and two tugboats out the channel.

Out on the bay, our plan was to cut west across the shipping channel and then head north to Red Rock Island. We ended up paddling parallel to the channel while the tugs maneuvered the ship as they went north and then made a U-turn to join the shipping channel going south. Normally there are ferries zipping by on the Vallejo to San Francisco run, but no ferries today.

Once the shipping channel was clear, we headed for Red Rock. We had calm water and a bit of a boost from the current on the tail end of the flood. Slack water was predicted for 1 p.m., although we were mindful that current and tide predictions can be off by an hour or more in this part of the bay. We circled the island once, and then decided to land on a tiny beach on the southwest side of the island.

We had the island to ourselves. San Francisco was visible in the distance, some eight miles away. All around the Bay people were holed up in their homes under the order to stay at home. It seemed odd and liberating to be alone at the island, free of the anxieties that are plaguing the world. It also felt a bit odd to be paddling without our fellow Bay Area Sea Kayakers (BASK). Our paddling experiences are often quite social.

Calm water prevailed on our return trip. As we passed the channel marker buoy #7 at 1:00 p.m., we noted that there was no noticeable current, so it seems the tide and current predictions were accurate for this time and location.

Our paddle covered just over seven miles, and we were back around 2 p.m. We were in no rush to land our boats, so we paddled along the Richmond waterfront a bit, and took some time to refine our boat handling skills.

When we landed on the beach at the end of the paddle, we noticed that the parking lot was open and quite busy. A few people were on the the beach, walking dogs and fishing. Most seemed to be practicing social distancing.

Stay safe and check out this link for more photos.

Between Storms

Thursday, December 5, we had a lull between storms which gave us the opportunity to go paddling. We joined a few of our Bay Area Sea Kayaker (BASK) friends and launched from Ferry Point in Richmond. Our plan was to circumnavigate Brooks Island with a lunch stop along the way. From Ferry Point we headed southwest around the end of the breakwater that protects the Richmond harbor.

Once around the breakwater we headed east, passing Brooks Island, watching the harbor seals that were resting at Bird Rock and continuing to the Albany Bulb. We had hoped to land at a little beach on the Albany Bulb, but the tide was so low that there was no beach, only rocks. We decided to check Point Isabel, a short distance away, but before we got there we found a little pocket beach we dubbed Twin Towers Beach. There we landed and broke out our lunches.

Back on the water we headed towards the Richmond waterfront, paddling past the Red Oak Victory. The quiet water and soft lighting with clouds made for some interesting lighting effects for photography.

At one point I was mesmerized by the pattern of ripples forming behind the boat in front of me. Like dropping a pebble in a pond creating radiating concentric rings, each dip of the paddle would create such a pattern, with the rings drifting off behind the boat and alternating on the left and right; the rings expanding and merging together. It seems the still water and the particular quality of light created a dance. It was a subtle effect and not something I could capture with the camera.

As we neared Ferry Point on our return we speculated about the graffiti which reads “KEEPS” on the old Terminal One building. It seems this piece of real estate is destined to become luxury condominiums. Our paddle covered 8.8 miles. Please feel free to explore more photos here. Fellow BASK members will appreciate the gallery since I made a point of capturing “portraits” of paddlers, taking advantage of the soft light which I find ideal for this kind of photography. You can also view the track log here.

Back on the Water

On Thursday April 12, I manged to get back on the water to go paddling.  We were off to Africa in late February and upon returning home in mid-March I developed bronchitis which kept me off the water for a couple of weeks. Almost two months without a padding “fix!”

In any event,  my schedule permitted me to join my BASK friends for the Thursday Lunch paddle on April 12. Our journey took us from Ferry Point to Point Molate.  We paddled past the tanker pier at the Chevron facility in Richmond. Note the words on the superstructure of one of the tankers “Protect the Environment.” Seems a bit ironic. We had blue sky with puffy cumulus clouds and calm water. There were four of us and our paddle covered eight miles. You can view a track of the paddle here.  As we approached the San Rafael Bridge, I was struck by the graphic element of the bridge with the clouds and I thought it might make an interesting black and white image. What do you think?

 

Rain or Shine

I managed to get back on the water today with some of my BASK kayaking friends. We launched from Ferry Point in Richmond, paddled around Brooks Island, stopped at Barbara and Jay Vincent Park for lunch. After lunch we got back in our boats, paddled through the pilings under the Craneway Pavilion and along the waterfront, slipping into Brickyard cove to say hello to a fellow paddler, and back to our launch point. The weather was quite calm with overcast which created some interesting photo opportunities with reflections on the water, soft light and the urban aspect of the Richmond waterfront. You can view a track of our paddle here and you can view more photos of our adventure here.