Oix to Sales de Llerca

On June 8 our hike takes us from Oix to Sales de Llierca. Our accommodations in Oix is a 16th century farm house that has been converted to a small hotel. Nothing fancy in the way of accommodations but comfortable. Likewise the food is good, but nothing fancy. The view from our balcony looks out over tile roofs to the green hills beyond.

Oix is a tiny hamlet with no stores so we ask the manager to make us lunches. We’re on the trail at 9:50 am. Hiking through oak woodlands and grassy meadows, past white, blue and yellow wildflowers. We also see yellow Scotch Broom and I wonder if it’s an invasive here like it is in California.

I’m dragging a bit, perhaps too much wine with dinner. It takes me awhile to get my hiking stride. Mid-morning we stop for a snack in the shade of some small oak trees that look much like the live oaks of California, except much smaller in stature. At 12 pm we stop near an abandoned farm house and we each eat half a sandwich saving the second half for a later snack, since we’re anticipating a long day.

Later in the afternoon we cross a ridge and the town of Sales de Llerca comes into view. We’ve seen nobody on the trail since leaving Oix. As we approach the medieval bridge over the river Llierca we see a few hikers and a few people swimming in the river.

We reach our accommodations at Can Serola at 6:35 in the evening having logged 12.8 miles (20.3 km). Can Serola is on a hill about 2 miles above Sales Sales de Llierca. A beautiful old house in a beautiful setting. Here we’re served an exquisite five course dinner with olive paste on toast, creme of broccoli, green salad with goat cheese pastries (simply out of this world, like little philo dough pastries stuffed with cheese and fried), a beet dish with julienne beets, walnuts and goat cheese, and the main course of roast duck with fruit, and wine. My mundane English descriptions hardly do the meal justice. Our Macs Adventure itinerary may include meals with some locations and other locations we may be free to eat in local restaurants, depending on what facilities are near our lodgings.

A Day with Monet

March 5. My birthday! I decided to play hookie. Client work will have to wait. Started the day by walking the dog. My wife Joann joined me. Just as we were heading out the door she asks “how does 69 feel?” I think she’s referring to the weather so I responded that it doesn’t feel that warm. She replied saying that I was in denial. Perhaps. I told her I was feeling younger this week than last week. I spent a good long day Sunday in a kayak, came back exhausted and with a few sore muscles, but nothing like physical activity to make me feel younger. I said “feels like 55,” which was probably closer to the temperature outside as well. Not sure I’m willing to admit that next year is the big seven-oh. Get your party hat ready!

Treve at Monet: The Late Years. de Young Museum. San Francisco

Claude Monet was born in 1840 in Paris and died in 1926 in Giverny. Not being much of a student of art I was surprised that he was painting in the early 20th century. I was also surprised by the size of some of the canvases, and with his fascination with water and flowers. It was an inspiration to see his work in person.

Everyone discusses my art and pretends to understand, as if it were necessary to understand, when it is simply necessary to love.

Monet

After the exhibit we headed home by way of Love at First Bite Bakery in Berkeley where we bought a cup cake, chocolate caramel sea salt.

Slow Food

Joann at Red Rock Canyon State Park. Slow Food Breakfast in the Dutch Oven.
Joann at Red Rock Canyon State Park. Slow Food Breakfast in the Dutch Oven.

We’re home and and with an internet connection I can share some of the adventures from our recent desert trip.

January 27 marked day two of our trip. 9:25 AM I opened the lid on the Ditch Oven to serve up breakfast; Mushroom and Brie Breakfast Strada, a recipe out of Robin Donovan’s The Camp Dutch Oven Cookbook. We were ready to eat. Breakfast had been in the works since 8 am when I started the coals and the aroma coming from the oven was mouth watering.

I’ve become a fan of Dutch Oven cooking and the cookbook was a Christmas gift from my son and daughter-in-law. The Dutch oven seems appropriate for winter trips, hot food on chilly mornings and evenings. And with short days, the oven can cook after dark, after I’m done messing about photographing the sunset.

Our Campsite at Red Rock Canyon State Park

After breakfast it was off to Anza Borrego, but not before we made a stop at Home Depot in Landcaster for a quick repair on the camper. It was dark when we arrived at Red Rock Canyon. While positioning our rig in we backed up into a Joshua Tree and knocked out the window in the rear door of the camper. Even with the backup camera located on the bumper we couldn’t see the tree limb that was threatening our rig. A lesson to pay close attention and perhaps have a spotter watch what’s happening when setting up camp in the dark.

We’re off to Anza Borrego Desert State Park, then on to Organ Pipe National Monument in Arizona, with our return trip taking us through the Mojave Desert. We have our dog Carson with us, so it will be interesting to see how we manage since many national parks and state parks for that matter do not permit dogs on trails. Here’ at Red Rock Canyon me managed with Carson on the leash.

Merry Christmas from the Alabama Hills

Merry Christmas from the Alabama Hills.

Wishing you a Merry Christmas. We are camped in the Alabama Hills in the Eastern Sierra with what appears to be an annual ritual. We were here last year. This year we represent three generations of Johnsons, the the newest addition, Annabelle, being five months old. We arrived the afternoon of Christmas Eve, set up camp, got the camp fire going along with the coals for the Dutch Oven. Dinner was Chicken Cordon Bleu, with wine to wash it down.

We were surprised by a rain storm passing through in the middle of the night, but we were snug in our beds when the sound of rain on the roof woke us. We woke to find that water that had collected in the camp chairs had frozen solid. Even so we took our time getting the campfire and Dutch Oven coals going, being torn between the photo opportunities of the early morning light and the anticipation of breakfast. Breakfast was quiche cooked in the Dutch Oven. After breakfast we poked around the hills and rocks, A cold wind was starting to find it’s way through our jackets, so we broke camp and headed back to Big Pine.

The Alabama Hills are located in the Eastern Sierra, just west of the town of Lone Pine. The Alabama Hills is managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as the BLM Alabama Hills Recreation Area. There is no fee for camping and there are also not much available for services. No picnic tables, no outhouses, no water. It is also dog friendly; our two dogs were happy to wander around camp off leash. I’m always surprised to see how many people camp here over the Christmas holiday, but that said there is no shortage of spaces to camp. Last year we picked a spot that was exposed and had had a view of Mount Whitney, the tallest mountain peak in the lower 48 states. This year, with the prediction of wind we found a more protected spot with an outcrop of rocks to block the north wind.

This is a popular spot for photographers who wish to photograph the classic morning light on Mount Whitney, Lone Pine Peak and the adjacent Sierra Nevada Mountains. The granite outcroppings also provide endless opportunities for photography. This is also a popular filming location, especially Westerns. Since the 1920s, 150 movies and a dozen or so television shows have been filmed here. There are also dozens of natural arches, with one of the more popular arches being Mobius Arch. The location is also noted it’s dark skies which makes it poplular for astronomy and astro-photography. Not far the North on Highway 395 is the Manzanar National Historic Site, another location worth a visit.

Chasing Frank Lloyd Wright: October 6

October 6, 2018. Our day started with breakfast at the Courageous Bakery. On a Saturday morning it’s a busy place. I can see why. Delicious food, and a great menu. After the better part of a week eating rich food I went with the oatmeal: steel cut oats, house made granola, fresh blueberries, brown sugar, wildflower honey, touch of cream. My standard breakfast is oatmeal, so this was like comfort food. A good bowl of oatmeal keeps me satisfied until lunch.

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After breakfast we thought we’d have a leisurely drive to West Lafayette, Indiana. We didn’t account for crossing a time zone though, which took an hour out of our day.  With a quick stop at a road side rest, we grabbed the bread, cheese, salami and fruit we had, and ate on the road arriving at Samara House just in time for our 2 PM tour.

The Samara House is one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s later designs, and much different in many ways than his earlier Prairie School designs. This is one of his Usonian Designs.

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When we arrived at the house, we parked and had to hunt a bit for the front door. As with most of Wright’s houses, he wants to lead you on a journey to find the front entrance.

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Later we thought it might be fun to tour the campus of Purdue University, which is also in West Lafayette. Not knowing our way around though, and being a Saturday, we stopped at the Greyhouse Coffee and Supply to regroup. We ducked into the doorway just as a torrential downpour let loose.

Back on the road, the rain gave way to a rainbow and we decided to get off the main highway and look for an opportunity to photograph some of the countryside.

Our final destination for the day was Elwood, a small town of about 8400. We had reservations for a lovely B&B in an old Victorian house. Once settled in we were off to dinner at the Tin Plate Restaurant.

tjp_1916_3460We split an order of a pulled pork sandwich and wings, both listed as the house specialties. Good food, but the local knowledge seems to favor the tenderloin.

 

Pupfish Cafe in Bishop – Waffle Warning

Treve at the Pupfish Cafe
Treve at the Pupfish Cafe

Bishop California, located in the Eastern Sierra is one of those places you normally pass through on your way to some of the spectacular scenery of the Eastern Sierra. Visitors passing through are likely to stop for breakfast at one of the higher profile eateries that have a prominent presence on Main Street. Less visible, but favored by locals is the Pupfish Cafe at 124 S. Main Street. If you like waffles the Leige waffles are a must. Simply delicious. Crisp and buttery with a pillow soft inside. Also a delicious assortment of avocado toasts and great coffee.