The Vaccination Experience

After I received my first Pfizer vaccination yesterday, I was handed a card documenting the fact. As I took the card I immediately flashed back to a time in the mid-1950s when I was handed a similar card after waiting in line for the Salk Polio vaccine. I remember we walked from our house to the Community Center where we were given sugar cubes with the vaccine.

With so many people anxious to get the COVID vaccination I thought I might share my experience. With all the news about the scarcity of the vaccine and the challenges in administering it, I did not have high hopes of getting a vaccination in a timely fashion. I have been out of town for most of February which added to the challenge. On Monday though, February 15, I thought I would check to see what was going on in my home county, Alameda County. I was surprised to find that there were a number of slots open for later in the week when I would be home. I signed up for 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 19. The signup process left me a bit anxious since it said that only Berkeley residents were eligible. I called the phone number on appointment verification email and was informed that all Alameda County residents over 65 were eligible.

I made it a point of arriving a few minutes early, driving the short distance from my house to the parking lot at Golden Gate Fields race track. It was 3:58 when I arrived at the first check point where I was asked to show my driver’s license and to confirm I was over 65. From there I was directed to a line of waiting cars.

At the second check point the attendant noted my appointment reference number. I had printed off the email with the QR code. From there it was a short wait to the vacation station. I had worn a t-shirt with a light jacket thinking I’d want have my arm readily available. I took off my jacket in anticipation. A sign at the second station said no photographs, so I put my phone down.

On the attendant’s cue I pulled forward to the injection station. The attendant was quite friendly, noted I had my BASK (Bay Area Sea Kayaking) hat on and said he “lived to dive.” We chatted briefly and then I opened the car door to give him access to my arm. After the injection, a second attendant wrote the number 442 on my windshield. Then I was off to the next station.

Here the attendant held up a QR code for me to scan with my phone; the code taking me to a website to sign up for my second dose. Then it was off to the “observation lounge” to wait to make sure I didn’t have any immediate allergic reaction. At 4:42 the attendant gave me the thumbs up and five minutes later I was home.

Escape From the Bay Area

Five o’clock in the morning my alarm goes off. I looked out the camper window and decided it was too dark to get up. I hit the snooze button and went back to sleep. Ten minutes later I awoke again and was surprised how much the light had changed. I was quickly out the camper door. At 5:15 I had my camera pointed at the sky above the rocks. The brilliant and fleeting color lasted just a few minutes. By 5:25 the color was gone. Sunrise was 5:34, so the lesson is to get up early to catch the sun.

I’m camped in the Alabama Hills. The photos from the big camera will have to wait until I get home next week. I managed to get away without a card reader to transfer the images from the memory cards. Needless to say the iPhone does a good job for capturing images to share here.

The Alabama Hills is in the Eastern Sierra, in the Owen’s Valley, 375 miles from home. While it’s still in California, it seems like a world away from the anxious throngs of people in the Bay Area hunkered down with stay-at-home orders to avoid the risk of COVID-19. No masks here. There are quite a few campers considering the location, but we are all quite spread out. This is dispersed camping on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. No services, so you need to be prepared.

After a morning in the solitude of the rocks and desert, I’m feeling quite refreshed. Three months of shelter-in-place was taking a toll on my mental attitude, wondering if I’d ever get out in the camper again.

We brought the camper over to spend some time playing grandparents while our son and daughter-in-law work. My wife will spend several weeks. I’m spending a week and a half. We justified our escape from the stay-at-home order by considering our childcare services to be essential. So here we are. And while visiting, I’m inclined to go explore some of my favorite haunts in the Eastern Sierra.